Body Balance Quarterly #3

2016 has been off to a slow start regarding poor weather conditions and we are very fortunate to that when it comes to shovelling snow and the protection of our backs. We are reminded however that winter is not quite over and spring snow tends to be quite heavy and more difficult to move.

Remember these quick tips to promote safe shovelling:

  • Tip # 1. 
    If you experience pain of any kind, stop immediately and seek assistance.
  • Tip # 2. 
    Choose a snow shovel that is right for you!

    • Be sure that your shovel has a curved handle, as this enables you to keep your back straighter when shoveling.
    • Obtain a shovel with an appropriate length handle. The length is correct when you can slightly bend your knees, flex your back 10 degrees or less, and hold the shovel comfortably in your hands at the start of the “shoveling stroke”.
    • A plastic shovel blade will generally be lighter than a metal one, thus putting less strain on your spine.
    • Sometimes, a smaller blade is better than a larger blade. Although a small blade can’t shovel as much, it avoids the risk of trying to pick up a too heavy pile of snow with a larger blade.
  • Tip # 3.
    Push the snow, do not lift it. Pushing puts far less strain on the spine than lifting.
  • Tip # 4.
    Be sure your muscles are warm before you start shoveling. Cold, tight muscles are more likely to sprain or strain than warm, relaxed muscles.
  • Tip # 5.
    When you grip the shovel, make sure your hands are at least 12 inches apart. By creating distance between your hands, you increase your leverage and reduce the strain on your body.
  • Tip # 6.
    “If you must lift the snow, lift it properly. Squat with your legs apart, knees bent and back straight. Lift with your legs. Do not bend at the waist. Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it. Holding a shovel of snow with your arms outstretched puts too much weight on your spine. Never remove deep snow all at once; do it piecemeal. Shovel and inch or two; then take another inch off. Rest and repeat if necessary.” In addition to these comments, remember to move your feet rather than twisting.
  • Tip # 7.
    Never throw snow over your shoulder.
  • Tip # 8.
    Remember that wet snow can be very heavy. One full shovel load can weigh as much as 25 pounds.
  • Tip # 9. 
    Pace yourself by taking frequent breaks to gently stretch your back, arms and legs.
  • Tip #10.
    Consider buying a snow-blower. When used correctly, a snow-blower will put far less strain on your back than snow shoveling.

SOURCE OF INFOMATION:   http://www.coloradospineinstitute.com/subject.php?pn=wellness-snow-shoveling

Topic of interest – Paediatric Sports Injury

A common injury for Paediatric sports that involve a lot of jumping (basketball, volleyball) is the pain and inflammation caused by “jumpers knee”. The following stretching recommendations are not intended as treatment but are advised to be done in the prevention of injury.

If you suffer from constant pain below the knee or experience episodes of inflammation and pain in relation to the sport that you are participating in; it is recommended that you consult your Physician or Health Care Provider to determine the course of treatment that is best for your injury.

Stretching and strength exercises should not be done or pursued in the presence of pain. It is important to stop any exercise in the presence of pain and consult your Health Care Practitioner.

Key point #1

Maintain ankle mobility – Tight calf muscles or poor ankle mobility have a negative impact on the knee. In picture one the back leg remains straight and in picture two the back leg bends at the knee. These stretches address different muscle groups and assist in the prevention of stiffness at the ankle.

ankle-stretch-1

Key point #2

Maintain proper range of motion in the Quads and Hamstring muscles – These muscles have a direct impact on the mechanics of the knee and maintaining good flexibility in these muscles goes a long way in injury prevention

leg-stretch-1

Key point #3

Strengthen the muscles of the hip – It is especially important to strengthen the gluteal muscles and abductor muscles of the hip as these muscles help to control the stability of the femur.

hip-stretch-1

Spring is Near!

This Issue started with reminders on stretches and injury prevention for shovelling and we would like to end it on a more inspiring topic, GOLF! Yes, golf season is getting closer and closer and that’s a lot better to think about than shovelling so if golf is your thing check out this link for a few key points on stretching before you get out and swing that golf club for the first time in four or five months!

http://www.golf.com/video/stretches-try-playing-round-golf